Tag Archives: Excuses

Speed Chess

Is typing speed a factor in programmer productivity? Would you improve at chess if you moved the pieces faster?

Jason Gorman, who appears to be a relatively reflective programmer based on his blog and his twitter, tweeted this comment about chess a few days ago.

A bunch of people I follow ReTweeted, and it caught my attention because I used to think this way, both about chess and programming.

Now I don’t claim to be the greatest at either activity, but I’ve put some time and I have enough ability to claim to be above average at both. (Which is to say, I’m aware of my relative mediocrity when compared with real masters)

I’ve played chess off and on for years. I learned to play when I was quite young and I could usually beat other casual players quite easily. After losing to rated tournament players, I spent some time studying the game.

For a long time, I thought the best way to learn was to methodically look for the best move and I thought playing blitz games was somewhat degenerate. Luckily, someone convinced me to start playing blitz games regularly, and that accelerated my understanding of the game considerably.

I still play better when I take the time to be methodical, but that’s not the same thing as learning. I think the blitz games accelerated my learning for two reasons, first, because playing at that speed put that many more games, positions and patterns in front of me and two, because I didn’t attach as much ego to the games I experimented more, which led to that many more positions.

I do think there is a point of diminished returns to just move the pieces faster, and improvement is predicated on some reflection, but I will contend unequivocally that, unless you are a master, you will improve at chess if you spend a considerable portion of your playing time moving the pieces faster.

The same applies to code. You don’t need to type +100 words per minute, but if you can’t touch type at least 40-50 wpm, spend the 20 minutes a day for a month or so until you can. You will never regret it. (And I worked as a programmer for years before I could touch type.)

I would walk you through the arguments, but there is already a classic Yeggethon on the topic, which articulates all the positions I would and then some.

“Lose Your First 100 Games As Quickly As Possible”
–Proverb for Go Beginners

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