Tag Archives: Awesome

Practical Puppet at MWRC

**update** The underlying repos changed so the demo won’t work from the user data. It will still work after running ‘apt-get update’ on the box. If I get bored I might repackaged it.

*update*  Confreaks has my MWRC video up. The notes below about launching on EC2 are probably still useful for context.

These are my slides from Mountain West Ruby Conf.

Starts with a little intro about the beginning of computing, before ‘computer science’, driven by desire for computation in math and physics, when there wasn’t a division between the people that program and people that understand how the systems work. (this period probably lasted for about 10 minutes.)

Then some Puppet code…

These modules will build passenger and install rails.

Finishes with a short discussion on the tribes, trading ideas, evolutions, the opportunity of clouds and encouraging people to do something awesome.

The talk was given with a live demo of this code building rails in EC2.

You can do it too if you have an EC2 account.

Start ami-2b10f742 littleidea/mwrcpuppetrailsdemo.manifest.xml sending this as the user data:

#!/usr/bin/env puppet

rails::site{ the_next_big_thing:
servername => "www.tnbt.com",
rails_version => "2.2.2"
}

Set the server name and the rails version to whatever you want.

If you need more gems or packages you can add:

#for gems
package { gemname:
    ensure => installed,
    provider => gem
}

#for native packages
package { pgkname:
    ensure => installed,
}

If you need a certain version of a gem or package, change ‘installed’ to the version you want (the default will install the latest available.)

The image is based on ami-7cfd1a15 Ubuntu Intrepid packaged by Eric Hammond with puppet and facter installed. The puppet manifests from the slides are modules found in /usr/share/puppet/modules.

When the ami starts up it will grab the user data and run it.

You can also ssh to your instance and just put the puppet code in a file (strip the #! /usr/bin/puppet) and run puppet –debug to watch it build.

puppet --debug mysite.pp
Advertisements

Semantics Matter (or I finally get it…)

Silence is better than unmeaning words.

-Pythagoras

Over the time I’ve been programming, I’ve come to value certain things in a code base. Without going into too much detail (which will probably be its own post soonish), I value code that is easy to understand and manipulate.

The first level of understanding, which is facilitated by the style and organization in a code base is ‘What’. If I can look at code and mentally map ‘What’ it is doing, I start to get a level of productive joy. I can’t get that if I’m trying to sort out which branch of the if-else plinko, meta-scrambled self.foo or side effect driven development is actually getting executed at any given moment. ‘What’ is really really nice.

A higher level of understanding code is ‘Why’. ‘Why’ is more subtle, but orders of magnitude more powerful than ‘What’. ‘What’ is a technique, ‘Why’ is the purpose, the driving principle. Understanding ‘Why’ gives flexibility and options to ‘What’. (Unfortunately, most code does a poor job of conveying ‘What’, let alone ‘Why’, but that is a topic for another day.)

Which brings me to ‘semantics matter’, which is something I’ve heard Luke say over and over when talking about Puppet. When I heard him before, I just nodded and thought he was talking about nifty Puppet language features like ‘after’ and ‘subscribe’ for managing relationships between services and the underlying packages and config files, because that was what he was using as the example. I was understanding the ‘What’ level.

You think I would have figured this out faster after listening to Luke rant about it so much, but the whole ‘semantics’ thing didn’t click until a discussion with Teyo about preparing for his ‘Golden Images’ talk at Linux Plumbers Conf.

Do not make a golden image...

Do not make a golden image...

Puppet let’s one model system configuration with code. Just like any other language, the ‘What’ and especially the ‘Why’ can be made apparent if the code is organized in certain ways and/or if one shares certain metaphors with the original author.

Until quite recently, I was having a hard time understanding why rebuilding virtual images with Puppet was superior to just versioning working images. I mean I heard the words, but in my mind I was questioning the practical difference. In one case you start with a base image, get everything set up and save the working copy, in the other you start with the base image and let puppet build it up. I kept thinking to myself, what is the difference, both solutions end up in the same place, right?

Being afraid to turn off real machines where you have no idea what is running, because there might be some critical cron job that matters on the third Tuesday of the month is one thing… (this happens, for real, some of you know this is true, someone reading this works at places like this right now, guaranteed), but once everything is virtual and running what you want, what’s the harm of just making images?

The difference is the potential to encode ‘What’, and if your code is sensibly organized, ‘Why’.

I was only seeing the static state of the working system. What if you want to change things? If you have working images, you have to reconstruct ‘What’ by discovery, good luck with ‘Why’. If you are lucky, it was you that set up the systems and it wasn’t over 6 months ago. The ‘What’ and ‘Why’ were apparent to someone, potentially you, when the systems were first set up, but now you just have this bucket of bootable bits that ostensibly does something. If it isn’t working, or there is a need to change something significant, the choice is poking around the bucket of bits until the new ‘What’ is in place or starting over with a new ‘Why’ that is lost as soon as the new image is finished.

If Puppet is building your services, ‘What’ and ‘Why’ can be recorded, clarified, recovered and manipulated. Version control becomes straight forward, manageable, and transparent. Services can have clear definitions and relationships. So obvious… can’t believe it took me this long to ‘get it’…

How many 500 MB images do you want to version? Can you make any sense of the diffs? Really? Seriously?


OATV Startup/FOO Camp Redux

Last week, Luke and I rolled up the California coast to Sebastopol, headquarters for O’Reilly publishing/conferences. I wanted to keep all the possibilities open so I tried not to have set expectations.

Luke, me and an apple tree

Luke, me and an apple tree

Startup Camp was 8 companies in various stages, but all towards the earlier side, sharing with each other and absorbing advice and inspiration from people that have been there and done that. (metaphorically speaking)

We had sessions with other programmers, experts on creating passionate users, investors, successful entrepreneurs and last but not least Tim O’Reilly. Each of these sessions and people could be a book, let alone a blog post. I have plenty of work to do, but if you are interested you might get some mileage out of searching twitter for startupcamp.

We also got to socialize with some of the people presenting and the founders from some of the OATV portfolio companies. Great people, with invaluable insight and I hope some new life long friendships…

And then there was FOO… Wow, the best word I’ve come up with so far is ‘enchanted’.

How else can you describe camping out with ~400 people all doing amazing things? I’m not sure there are many places where you could have high quality conversations about random technology, economic models, philanthropy, hypercoding, agile development, martial arts, user interfaces, data visualization, the cello, education, geometric paper folding, theoretical physics, film making and Ugandan hip hop, back to back to back. And that was just my thin slice of the experience. Puppet got a lot of love, I just hope no one found me too boorish once the topic came up. Oh, yeah, and when everyone else goes to bed, the hardcore werewolf begins… Hi, I’m Andrew, a villager.

Engaging enough that I didn’t twitter for much of it, and that is saying a lot.

My mind is still spinning from the experience and hopefully some of those racing thoughts will solidify enough to express.

Now we just need to have the kind of year that gets us invited back.


%d bloggers like this: