Dysfunction: Inattention to Results

Never mistake motion for action.

– Ernest Hemingway

The final dysfunction from The Five Dysfunctions of a Team is Inattention to Results. This ultimate team dysfunction occurs when members of the team value something other than the collective goals.

This dysfunction doesn’t mean they have lives and balance outside the context of the company (that’s another post. . .) but that the members of the team are focused on highlighting their own achievements regardless of the overall outcome.

You can smell this dysfunction when individuals or groups start to point to everything they did right, even when the overall project is flailing. (maybe especially when it is flailing)

“Product management did such a good job of creating requirements, its those lousy developers that didn’t understand, I mean just look at this pretty document. Don’t you love the font . . .”

“I wrote the code exactly to the spec, not that those idiot clients and product managers know what they want anyway . . . I am a programming god.”

Have you ever participated in either side of that conversation? Played Not-my-fault-I-am-teh-awesome hot potato?

(Quality Assurance gets blamed for everything, cause as everyone knows ‘kwalytee’ starts with the last people who touched the software, duh. . . You do have QA, right?)

There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.

– Peter Drucker

Inattention to Results is most damaging to an organization when it becomes institutionalized processes. When people stop trying to do the best thing and just make sure they go through the checklist.

When things go South, the checklist becomes a buzzword compliant shield, an Agile security blanket.

When I first read the model, I thought the most important dysfunction to address was trust, because it is the foundation of all the other dysfunctions. After a little reflection, I’m starting to think that you need at least as much focus on results, if not more. Sure you need to work on trust, because if you don’t, eventually the rest of the dysfunctions grow to be monstrous, but ‘winning’ gives you the opportunity to work through a lot of trust issues. Especially, if working on trust (. . .conflict, commitment, accountability. . .) is an explicit goal.

This is all well and dandy, but what does that mean? How can I use this?

There is not a formula that you can just plug in and solve this problem. On some level, this is all about culture. On another, an individual, not on top of the food chain, recognizing these dysfunctions has to navigate between Scylla and Charybdis. One becomes faced with the prospect of being at odds with the perception of management, watching and suffering the dysfunctional culture, or finding something else to pay the mortgage.

(eh, maybe that’s why the book’s target audience is executive teams. . .)

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

– Albert Einstein

what to do?

Reflect and adjust my friend. . . Reflect and Adjust

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