Dysfunction: Avoidance of Accountability

The ancient Romans had a tradition: whenever one of their engineers constructed an arch, as the capstone was hoisted into place, the engineer assumed accountability for his work in the most profound way possible: he stood under the arch.

Back to The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, so we have built up Trust, Conflict and Commitment. What do we need now?

Accountable: subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify something; responsible; answerable.

In the model from the book, the avoidance of accountability is a psychological byproduct of the underlying dysfunctions of the team. Without firm commitments, after healthy disagreements are addressed, there is a tendency to not hold people accountable. We have a hard time holding people accountable, when we know they never really committed.

Ok. . . uhm, and?

How many of you have witnessed(participated in) the following scenario?

  • Incredible pressure to deliver a product/feature
  • Developers are hacking their little hearts out (very few tests being written, of course)
  • Quality Assurance is testing whatever they can see flying over the wall (with little or no prior knowledge of what it will be, bless their little hearts)
  • Product Management is doing whatever they do (anything but looking at what is actually being developed)
  • Daily stand ups where no problems are mentioned
  • We are so Agile, yay

Features delivered are a disaster. . . PMs are freaking out, Devs are indignant, QA is whimpering in the corner. What happens next? Rinse and Repeat. . . WTF?!??

I believe one of the fundamental principles of all Agile methods is ‘Reflect and Adjust‘. The built in adjustment is only going to help your team if it isn’t used as an excuse to ‘just do better next time’.

It is not only what we do, but also what we do not do, for which we are accountable.

– Molier

That doesn’t mean I’d advocate command and control shock and awe style, that just puts everyone into ‘cover your donkey’ mode and totally destroys the foundation of trust.

Honestly, Good Product Management is HARD. Good development is a creative endeavor that ebbs and flows. Good Quality Assurance is an acquired skill. All of these pieces are heavily dependent on each other.

Holding each other accountable doesn’t have to be antagonistic, but it does have to be honest. (truth, remember)

Brutally honest… Shit happens, but it doesn’t have to happen all the time.

Around the time of Caesar, there was a European tribe that, when the assembly horn blew, always killed the last warrior to reach his assigned place, and no one enjoyed fighting this tribe.

Don’t settle for mediocre, for yourself or for your organization.

Some people can’t handle ‘Truth’, and that is the seed for every other dysfunction.

Change your ‘organization’, or. . . change ‘your’ organization.

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